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"This is the same template our team uses to secure content features and links from Wired, Boingboing, Apartment Therapy and more."

Gisele Navarro

Operations Director at NeoMam Studios

The good news is that the big newspaper you’ve been pitching stories to for months has finally decided to feature your content.

The bad news is that you didn’t get a link. Yes, your brand was mentioned. Yes, the content was credited back to your client. But the sad truth is that your precious link is nowhere to be found.

If you build links primarily through content, you probably have felt the pain of an unlinked brand mention many times before.

At this point, most of us will move on and be grateful that at least they credited the content properly.

“That’s okay, I’m sure more sites will pick it up and some of them might link back to our site.”

“Well, we didn’t get the link but this is will be great for brand awareness.”

“It’s all good, I read somewhere that brand mentions may have some impact on how Google evaluates website authority.”

Here’s the deal:

If you’re reading this article, then chances are you’re producing and promoting content with the one goal of getting links.

You don’t do this thing day-in-day-out just to build brand awareness or in the hopes that perhaps that unlinked brand mention will trigger lots of links someday.

So don’t give up so easily.

In this article, we’ll put a twist to a quintessential link building technique to help you convert those brand mentions into links, and we’ll discuss things you can do to minimise the chances of journalists sharing your content without linking back to your site.

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You know what bothers me?

Articles that tell people they should – definitely, absolutely, no-doubts-about-it – rely on PR to support their SEO strategy.

You know why it bothers me?

Because it’s like recommending someone to use a spoon for whisking eggs.

Will the spoon get you there at some point?

Sure.

Is it the most efficient way to whisk eggs?

Of course not.

All this to say that PR and link building have different objectives.

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According to research conducted by The Radicati Group, the number of emails sent and received per day in 2015 reached a total over 205 billion, with an average of 131 business emails leaving and arriving to users’ accounts every day in 2016 so far.

That’s a lot of emails.

So, how can you ensure your messages are cutting through that noise? And what would be the proper email etiquette for a world in which our inboxes are never empty?

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No matter the job role, everyone at NeoMam uses Gmail.

Email is at the core of most of our processes – just to mention a few internal uses:

  • It’s how our project managers send deliverables to our clients.
  • Allows our design lead to discuss upcoming projects with illustrators and graphic designers.
  • Offers a way for our finance manager to chase invoices.
  • Is the medium through which our sales team reaches out to potential clients.
  • Is the number one tool our digital PR team uses to pitch content to journalists.
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Link-buying is a topic we discuss often at our offices.

On one side of the room, you’ll hear a team member mentioning that a blogger has asked for money or that we have lost the relationship with a publisher due to a new editor who now requests compensation.

On the opposite corner, you’ll hear me talking to a worried new client, who needs reassurance that we won’t exchange payment for features.

Dedicating part of our budget to buying links would certainly make a side of our work easier (i.e. getting those features up fairly quickly) but we’ve identified far too many reasons why it would be detrimental to our growth.

Today I will share why we refuse to exchange money for links, and hopefully this post will spark a constructive discussion about this practice.

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After promoting over 1000 infographics, our media relations team have learnt several lessons. In this post each member of the team will share some techniques on how to promote visual content and how these steps have helped us get results.

We have used an example throughout the post: The Herb Guide to Cooking Vegetarian, a campaign that started very slow, but by following these 6 steps, ended up securing placements on large publications, including Huffington Post, UK and US.   

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