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5 ways to turn your CV into an Infographic

Finding work can be hard, especially in today’s job climate. With over 2.5 million people in the UK looking for work, standing out from the crowd can be difficult. 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual, whereas text takes longer for the brain to process. Most people only remember 20% of what they read. This is why creating an Infographic CV instead of a boring text document can really make you stand out of the crowd when job hunting.

1. Sum up your skills visually

Presenting your skills visually can save you writing a lot of text on your CV. Take your most important skills that employers will find useful and sum them up using: pie charts, bar charts and circle area graphs.

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2. Create a timeline for past jobs

Instead of just having an extensive list of all your past jobs and experiences, create a simple timeline to show employers what you’ve been up to. Keep it simple and clean, over complicating the timeline is just as bad as a big block of text on your CV.

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3. Your education

Visualise your education and grades into a pie or bar chart to give you an edge. Years in attendance and grades achieved can all be viewed succinctly, without having to list every single subject you took. This can also merge into your job time line.

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4. Your hobbies and interests

Use little icons to visualise your hobbies and interests. If you’re a designer you can make this yourself. Alternatively, image stock websites are a great source for getting vector images. Also try to be creative in what you put down; everyone likes movies and television.

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5. Keep the design simple

Having an Infographic CV is all good and well but if the design is too cluttered and over complicated it can be just has bad as a standard text document. Try to stick to a colour palette that’s fewer than 5 colours so the design isn’t too garish. Websites like Kuler.adobe.com can help you pick out a colour scheme so the colours compliment each other. Make sure you use no more than 2 fonts, changing the weight of the font can also add variety without overcomplicating it.

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James McGuirk – Infographic Designer

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