Surprising Results Show Why Your Infographic Needs Outreach [Case Study]

NeoMam’s analysis of the travel infographic ‘The Game of Thrones Travel Guide’ looking at the results and the effect of infographic outreach and infographic promotion.

Game of Thrones Travel Guide Case Study title

Placements & social shares

This case study is interesting as it shows how outreach boosts results, particularly links. The infographic was initially placed on the clients website, relying on organic pick-up with no promotion or outreach whatsoever for 2 months. This has allowed us to see the effect of our outreach efforts.

GoT Backlinks

We tracked available links the infographic achieved through our blogger outreach software, Group High. Here are the social media metrics from all the links we identified.

Total Number of Placements

Total Number of Facebook Shares

Total Number of Pinterest Shares

Total Number of  Tweets

Total Number of  Google + Shares

Total Number of LinkedIn Shares

55

6415

429

426

127

28

The infographic got some excellent links from sites such as Design Taxi and Huffington Post.

huff post design taxi

Also gaining shares and views on geek/meme based websites like 9gag.com.

9gag GoT shares

The outreach process

Our outreach mirrors the investment and attention to detail we put into the ideas, research and design processes we have. This infographic received 8 hours of outreach, as well as seeding to 20+ infographic submission sites.

Using Group High, we researched and identified blogs that would have an affinity to the content, offering great places to get in touch with. This allowed us to create a list of 250+ blogs we knew would be suitable to feature the infographic.

Coupled with websites we already have a relationship with, our team of outreachers used a mix of templates and custom-written emails to contact the blog owners. We had a great response and the infographic spoke for itself.

For blogger outreach best practice, see what we think works in this guest post.

Max, who outreached the infographic, would also leverage the infographic further:

“The infographic theme is evergreen so it could be outreached at any time, but in order to receive more big links, outreaching it when the new series starts would give it an even better chance of obtaining them.”

Without outreach, the infographic would be stagnant, stuck with few links like the chart above. Much like many infographics on the web.

All of our outreached infographics also come with a report after 2 or 3 weeks. This allows us to report on the placements and social shares it received, which are the main KPIs we use.

GoT outreach report

What the designer had to say:

lizziehead

“The main features of this graphic are the comparison photographs so the rest of the design had to be fairly simple so as not to distract from these. The temptation with this project was to create a medieval themed design to reflect the subject, but I felt that a minimal, modern approach would better compliment the images. “

infographic detail 1

“Both the text and colour scheme were kept simple and unobtrusive, a light sans serif font and a neutral background with subtle highlight colours. The images have not been manipulated or edited which gives a realistic comparison of the TV stills and the real life locations.”

- Lizzie Astles, Infographic Designer for NeoMam

Why the idea was successful

We use the book ‘Contagious’ by Jonah Berger at NeoMam to inspire and analyse our ideas and see how they fit into the 6 STEPPS of successful ideas.

The following chart highlights the key points of the infographic and we believe is why it became shared so much. Note the high social currency and triggers -

GoT STEPPS Web

Top of mind, tip of tongue

Triggers make us think of something which leads to doing something such as talking and sharing.

The infographic was produced as the 3rd season of GoT was underway but wasn’t finished until after the end of the season. Usually, infographics related to movies or TV series such as this, are best received when they air (or when there are many triggers surrounding it). The infographic did surprisingly well though.

We’ve highlighted triggers because Game of Thrones is an anomaly. It’s so popular that just a hint of something relating to the series is pounced upon by fans. It’s a unique show that means fans are interested in any content that links in to it. Even a travel guide.

Searches for Game of Thrones peak when the series airs but the topic is still of interest between this time due to anticipation of the next series, rumours, etc. And this has grown as the series have become more popular.

game of thrones searches

It could even be argued that talk and interest about the show is just as high when it is not airing as fans try to fill the void with reminiscing and rumours.

We share things that make us look good

Social Currency is what drives people to share.

HBO has reported that Game of Thrones averaged 14.2 million viewers per episode last season. When we know something is popular, we like to imitate our approval and show people we like it too, making us appear in-the-know and cool. This can be anything from talking about our knowledge of the show with friends, or sharing content, say an infographic on it.

It could be argued that the travel guide is irrelevant, and that GoT has done all the hard work simply by tying itself to the content. It certainly provides the hook to pique interest, but we know that readers want something that not only looks good but provides some good info. After all, when they share the infographic, it’s also a reflection of them.

With our research and design, we think we got the social currency mix just right. What do you think?

 Game of Thrones Travel Guide

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